Tags

, , , , , ,

Today is Friday. A. Cold. Friday. Old man winter refuses to head north, so I decided to create a quick, hot, healthy dish while tipping my chapeau to seven generations of French ancestors and to an underused herb — Herbes de Provence.

an underused herb in American cooking ~

an underused herb in American cooking ~

begin with organic ingredients ~ skinless, boneless chicken thighs ( 1.25 lbs.), 32 oz  Imagine veggie broth, 1/2 pound each ~ baby carrots and red garnet sweet potato, peeled and cubed.

begin with organic ingredients ~ skinless, boneless chicken thighs (1.25 lbs.), 32 oz. Imagine veggie broth, 1/2 pound each ~ baby carrots and red garnet sweet potato, peeled and cubed.

1/2 lb. of pearl onions add a nice touch

1/2 lb. of pearl onions add a nice touch

Empty the quart of veggie broth into a medium stock pot.
Add one heaping tablespoon of Herbes de Provence. Bring to a boil.
One piece at a time, add chicken thighs, directly from package.
Reduce heat to medium and gently poach chicken for six minutes.
Off heat, let the chicken continue to poach for another six minutes, covered.

poaching chicken thighs

poaching chicken thighs on stove for six minutes, then off heat, continue to poach another six minutes

Remove chicken from broth, and place on a nearby plate.

poached chicken thighs

poached chicken thighs ~ oh, so tender

Strain broth through a China cap or other straining device and return broth to pot. This step will remove most the herbes, yet some remain on chicken.
Return broth to a boil and add onions, sweet potatoes, carrots, and a chunk of fennel (I happened to have one in the fridge). Reduce to a simmer, partially covered, for six minutes.

Simmering veggies

simmering veggies

While the veggies simmer, pull any fat off chicken thighs (there won’t be much) and cut/tear meat into smaller bits. Why thighs, you might wonder? Thigh meat has considerable flavor and it is oh, so tender!

tender bits of thigh

tender bits of thigh

When veggies are tender, using a spider, remove them to a plate.

strained veggies

strained veggies

Return broth to the original pot and bring back to the boil.
Add 2 heaping tablespoons of Arrowroot using a whisk to quickly incorporate into hot broth. Arrowroot is another underused thickener in America, yet its silky texture cannot be matched, and it does not need to be “cooked in” as flour or corn starch do.
When broth is nicely thick, in about one minute, add 1 teaspoon of fine salt and return chicken and all veggies to the pot to just warm.
Serve up into warm bowls.

finished dish ~ silken goodness your entire family will enjoy.

finished dish ~ silken goodness your entire family will enjoy.

This mild recipe will feed four nicely and I suggest serving it with a crusty baguette or lightly toasted Tuscan Pane. I considered making dumplings for this dish, and if I had not been so hungry, I think dumplings would be delightful. Joy of Cooking has many nice, simple dumpling recipes if you feel froggy. Further more, if someone in your home needs TLC, this is the go-to soup, as it is delicately seasoned and subtly sweet.

Let me know how you like this quick-to-prepare, tasty, warming bowl of goodness.

Cooks Note to Readers: purchase herbes and spices in small quantities from your local health-minded grocery. Store all herbes and spices in the freezer, prolonging shelf life. The brands and varieties of veggies mentioned are personal recommendations based on years of tasting experience. Arrowroot may be purchased in the bulk department of any fine health-minded grocery and it has a long shelf life.

Bon Appetit!

Copyright © 2014 by Diane LaSauce All Rights Reserved
“Respect the Earth; Create Memorable Food”